Disclaimer: This is a personal web page. Contents written here do not represent the position of my employer.

Saturday, February 08, 2020

 

Xamarin forks and whatnots

Busy days in geewallet world! I just released version 0.4.2.198 which brings some interesting fixes, but I wanted to talk about the internal work that had to be done for each of them, in case you're interested.
Last but not least, I wanted to mention something not strictly related to this new release. We got accepted in GNOME's gitlab, so now the canonical place to find our repository is here:

https://gitlab.gnome.org/World/geewallet

Technically speaking, this will allow us to drop GithubActions for our non-Linux CI lanes (we were already happy with our gitlab-ci recipes before we had to use GH! only limitation was that GitLab.com's free tier CI minutes for agents was Linux-only).

But in general we're just happy to be hosted by infrastructure from one of the most important opensource projects in the world. Special thanks go to Carlos Soriano and Andrea Veri for helping us with the migration.

PS: Apologies if the previous blogpost to this one shows up in planets again, as it might be a side-effect of updating its links to point to the new git repo!

Labels: , , , , , , , ,


Sunday, January 05, 2020

 

Introducing geewallet

Version 0.4.2.187 of geewallet has just been published to the snap store! You can install it by looking for its name in the store or by installing it from the command line with `snap install geewallet`. It features a very simplistic and minimalistic UI/UX. Nothing very fancy, especially because it has a single codebase that targets many (potential) platforms, e.g. you can also find it in the Android App Store.

What was my motivation to create geewallet in the first place, around 2 years ago? Well, I was very excited about the “global computing platform” that Ethereum was promising. At the time, I thought it would be like the best replacement of Namecoin: decentralised naming system, but not just focusing on this aspect, but just bringing Turing-completeness so that you can build whatever you want on top of it, not just a key-value store. So then, I got ahold of some ethers to play with the platform. But by then, I didn’t find any wallet that I liked, especially when considering security. Most people were copy+pasting their private keys into a website (!) called MyEtherWallet. Not only this idea was terrifying (since you had to trust not just the security skills of the sysadmin who was in charge of the domain&server, but also that the developers of the software don’t turn rogue…), it was even worse than that, it was worse than using a normal hot wallet. And what I wanted was actually a cold wallet, a wallet that could run in an offline device, to make sure hacking it would be impossible (not faraday-cage-impossible, but reasonably impossible).

So there I did it, I created my own wallet.

After some weeks, I added bitcoin support on it thanks to the library NBitcoin (good work Nicholas!). After some months, I added a cross-platform UI besides the first archaic command-line frontend. These days it looks like this:



What was my motivation to make geewallet a brain wallet? Well, at the time (and maybe nowadays too, before I unveil this project at least), the only decent brain wallet out there that seemed sufficiently secure (against brute force attacks) was WarpWallet, from the Keybase company. If you don’t believe in their approach, they even have placed a bounty in a decently small passphrase (so if you ever think that this kind of wallet would be hacked, you would be certainly safe to think that any cracker would target this bounty first, before thinking of you). The worst of it, again, was that to be able to use it you had again to use a web interface, so you had the double-trust problem again. Now geewallet brings the same WarpWallet seed generation algorithm (backed by unit tests of course) but on a desktop/mobile approach, so that you can own the hardware where the seed is generated. No need to write anymore long seeds of random words in pieces of paper: your mind is the limit! (And of course geewallet will warn the user in case the passphrase is too short and simple: it even detects if all the words belong to the dictionary, to deter low entropy, from the human perspective.)

Why did I add support for Litecoin and Ethereum Classic to the wallet? First, let me tell you that bitcoin and ethereum, as technological innovations and network effects, are very difficult to beat. And in fact, I’m not a fan of the proliferation of dubious portrayed awesome new coins/tokens that claim to be as efficient and scalable as these first two. They would need not only to beat the network effect when it comes to users, but also developers (all the best cryptographers are working in Bitcoin and Ethereum technologies). However, Litecoin and Ethereum-Classic are so similar to Bitcoin and Ethereum, respectively, that adding support for them was less than a day’s work. And they are not completely irrelevant: Litecoin may bring zero-knowledge proofs in an upcoming update soon (plus, its fees are lower today, so it’s an alternative cheaper testnet with real value); and Ethereum-Classic has some inherent characteristics that may make it more decentralised than Ethereum in the long run (governance not following any cult of personality, plus it will remain as a Turing-complete platform on top of Proof Of Work, instead of switching to Proof of Stake; to understand why this is important, I recommend you to watch this video).

Another good reason of why I started something like this from scratch is because I wanted to use F# in a real open source project. I had been playing with it for a personal (private) project 2 years before starting this one, so I wanted to show the world that you can build a decent desktop app with simple and not too opinionated/academic functional programming. It reuses all the power of the .NET platform: you get debuggers, you can target mobile devices, you get immutability by default; all three in one, in this decade, at last. (BTW, everything is written in F#, even the build scripts.)

What’s the roadmap of geewallet? The most important topics I want to cover shortly are three:
With less priority:

Areas where I would love contributions from the community:

And just in case I wasn't clear:

  • If you want to contribute, don’t ask me what to work on, just think of your personal itch you want to scratch and discuss it with me filing a GitLab issue. If you’re a C# developer, I wrote a quick F# tutorial for you.
  • Thanks for reading up until here! It’s my pleasure to write about this project.


  • I'm excited about the world of private-key management. I think we can do much better than what we have today: most people think of hardware wallets to be unhackable or cold storage, but most of them are used via USB or Bluetooth! Which means they are not actually cold storage, so software wallets with offline-support (also called air-gapped) are more secure! I think that eventually these tools will even merge with other ubiquitous tools with which we’re more familiar today: password managers!

    You can follow the project on twitter (yes I promise I will start using this platform to publish updates).

    PS: If you're still not convinced about these technologies or if you didn't understand that PoW video I posted earlier, I recommend you to go back to basics by watching this other video produced by a mathematician educator which explains it really well.

    Labels: , , , , , , , , ,


    Wednesday, January 23, 2019

     

    WORA-WNLF


    I started my career writing web applications. I had struggles with PHP web-frameworks, javascript libraries, and rendering differences (CSS and non-CSS glitches) across browsers. After leaving that world, I started focusing more on the backend side of things, fleeing from the frontend camp (mainly actually just scared of that abomination that was javascript; because, in my spare time, I still did things with frontends: I hacked on a GTK media player called Banshee and a GTK chat app called Smuxi).

    So there you had me: a backend dev by day, desktop dev by night. But in the GTK world I had similar struggles as the ones I had as a frontend dev when the browsers wouldn’t behave in the same way. I’m talking about GTK bugs in other non-Linux OSs, i.e. Mac and Windows.

    See, I wanted to bring a desktop app to the masses, but these problems (and others of different kinds) prevented me to do it. And while all this was happening, another major shift was happening as well: desktop environments were fading while mobile (and not so mobile: tablets!) platforms were rising in usage. This meant yet more platforms that I wished GTK supported. As I’m not a C language expert (nor I wanted to be), I kept googling for the terms “gtk” and “android” or “gtk” and “iOS”, to see if some hacker put something together that I could use. But that day never happened.

    Plus, I started noticing a trend: big companies with important mobile apps started to stop using HTML5 within their apps in favour of native apps, mainly chasing the “native look & feel”. This meant, clearly, that even if someone cooked a hack that made gtk+ run in Android, it would still feel foreign, and nobody would dare to use it.

    So I started to become a fan of abstraction layers that were a common denominator of different native toolkits and kept their native look&feel. For example, XWT, the widget toolkit that Mono uses in MonoDevelop to target all 3 toolkits depending on the platform: Cocoa (on macOS), Gtk (on Linux) and WPF (on Windows). Pretty cool hack if you ask me. But using this would contradict my desires of using a toolkit that would already support Android!

    And there it was Xamarin.Forms, an abstraction layer between iOS, Android and WindowsPhone, but that didn’t support desktops. Plus, at the time, Xamarin was proprietary (and I didn’t want to get out of my open source world). It was a big dilemma.

    But then, some years passed, and many events happened around Xamarin.Forms:

    So that was the last straw that made me switch completely all my desktop efforts toward Xamarin.Forms. Not only I can still target Linux+GTK (my favorite platform), I can also make my apps run in mobile platforms, and desktop OSs that most people use. So both my niche and mainstream covered! But this is not the end: Xamarin.Forms has been recently ported to Tizen too! (A Linux-based OS used by Samsung in SmartTVs and watches.)

    Now let me ask you something. Do you know of any graphical toolkit that allows you to target 6 different platforms with the same codebase? I repeat: Linux(GTK), Windows(UWP/WPF), macOS, iOS, Android, Tizen. The old Java saying is finally here! (but for the frontend side): “write once, run anywhere” (WORA) to which I add “with native look’n’feel” (WORA-WNLF)

    If you want to know who is the hero that made the GTK driver of Xamarin.Forms, follow @jsuarezruiz which BTW has been recently hired by Microsoft to work on their non-Windows IDE ;-)

    PS: If you like .NET and GTK, my employer is also hiring! (remote positions might be available too) ping me 

    Labels: , , , , , , ,


    Tuesday, March 17, 2015

     

    How do you upgrade your distro? A tale of two workarounds

    Every classic Linuxer would know why it's very handy to dedicate a separate partition for the /home folder of your tree: you could in theory share it between multiple OSs that you installed in your box (which you choose to run when you start your computer).

    Now, I'm guessing that many people reading and nodding to the above, will also know that sharing /home/ is one thing, sharing $HOME (/home/yourUserName) is a completely different beast.

    For example: you have a stable distro installed in your box; you decide to install a new version of that distro along the old one, in the same box. You run the new distro with a new account tied to the old /home/yourUserName folder: KABOOM!!! Weird things start happening. Among these:

    To workaround these problems, I have a strategy: I use a different /home/ sub-directory for each distro installed in my system. For example, for distro X version A.B I use /home/knocteXAB/, for distro Y version C.D I use /home/knocteYCD/. The advantage about this is that you can migrate your settings manually and at your own pace. But then, you may be asking, how to really take advantage of sharing the /home folder when using this technique?

    Easy: I keep non-settings data (mainly the non-dotfiles) in a different /home/ folder with no associated account in any of the distros. For example: /home/knocte/ (no version suffix). Then, from each of the suffixed /home/ subfolders, I setup symlinks to this other folder, setting the appropriate permissions. For instance:

    You may think that it's an interesting strategy and that I'm done with the blog post, however, when using this strategy you may start finding buggy applications that don't deal very well with symlinked paths. The one I found which annoyed the most was my favourite Gnome IDE, because it meant I couldn't develop software without problems. I mean, they were not just cosmetic problems, really:

    So I had to use a workaround for my workaround: clone all my projects in $HOME instead of /home/knocte/Documents/Code/OpenSource/ (yah, I'm this organized ;) ).

    I've been trying to fix these problems for a while, without much time on my hands.

    But the last weeks a magical thing happened: I decided to finally sit down and try to fix the last two remaining, and my patches were all accepted and merged last week! (at least all the ones fixing symlink-related problems), woo!!!

    So the lessons to learn here are:

    Labels: , , , , ,


    Tuesday, May 20, 2014

     

    Banshee GSoC-2014 projects under Gnome umbrella

    Here we are, at the beginning of a great summer!

    This time, Google has given plenty of slots to the GNOME project, so we could accept many participants, including 3 brilliant students to work on the Banshee project. In case they haven't blogged about it, or didn't give much detail, I'll elaborate a bit about what they will be aiming to do these months:

    1. USB can work for the first sync, but whenever you update your library, I never remember to connect my phone again with my cable, or I'm too lazy to do it. Now imagine that whenever your phone is near your computer (and of course if you have Banshee running), they could negotiate together to update the sync without the need of moving a finger!
    2. Wifi could work also for the use case I just explained, but getting Wifi to work, compared to Bluetooth, would involve creating an app for the phone that could talk with Banshee. And we all know what are the problems associated with that: we would need to be cross-platform for at least the 3 main mobile platforms out there (well, iOS wouldn't even work neither with this nor with Bluetooth, because there are no public APIs to integrate with the music database of the OS, sigh iTunes...), and that means a lot of maintenance burden (even if we choose a same-language native platform like Xamarin), and a user experience that is not so seamless (as it would require the user to install an app first).
    As you can see, most things are work under-the-hood this year, with little UI work. That's good for me because I'm no design expert. However, there is one area which we could do with some help: the new backgound tasks that will be implemented will need a way to notify the user (i.e. SongKick: when a new gig is discovered; AcoustID: when new/better metadata is found). In this respect, maybe Hylke Bons (our chief designer for the last Gnome .NET hackfest) and Garrett LeSage (assistance that Hylke proposed now to avoid getting himself swamped!) will be able to help! (BTW, if you're interested in participating in this year's Gnome .NET hackfest, message David Nielsen, which started to plan it recently.)

    I'm very happy about starting the mentoring of these projects this year. And I'm specially jealous about my students... I became mentor of GSoC myself without being GSoC student first! (Maybe I should switch roles in the future?)

    Wish them good luck! It was actually just yesterday when GSoC really started! (gotta love mondays)

    UPDATE: Fixed embarrassing typo: I meant AcoustID, not OpenID!

    Labels: , , , ,


    Monday, May 05, 2014

     

    GSoC 2013 with Gnome

    So let this be a belated report about previous GSoC! sorry for the delay.

    In summer 2013, Tomasz Maczynski worked on Banshee as a GSoC student, and he did great work! He developed a SongKick extension, and a FanArt.tv one. Both were worked on in the banshee-community-extensions repository. They work very well but there are a few downsides about this work, which we didn't have time to fix:

    That is all folks! Stay tuned for the next blog post, which will explain the plan for GSoC 2014 (this year I get to mentor three students!).

    Labels: , , , ,


    Sunday, May 04, 2014

     

    Belated Gnome .NET Hackfest post

    OMG, I should feel embarrassed about posting such a belated blog post (yes, the hackfest was more than 6 months ago), but oh well, at least I can say I have enough excuses:
    So this doesn't leave enough room for blogging, which is a necessary but a less appealing task. But I have to say it somewhere: the hackfest that David Nielsen organized was amazing, the best kind I have attended so far, as I came to meet for the first time some awesome hackers such as him, and:

    (BTW I didn't include the awesome Bertrand Lorentz, fellow Banshee co-maintainer and GtkSharp gatekeeper, in the list, because I had already met him before, it wasn't my first time!).

    And it was with the latter Stephan (not Stefan) the one I ended up spending more time with, because we decided to work on the new GStreamerSharp bindings since the 2nd day of the hackfest (the 1st day I mainly worked with Bertrand to release Banshee 2.9.0, our first Gtk3 compatible release, which he already blogged about).

    So what was special about this work?
    "Polish" sounds like easy work, but it wasn't. We fixed lots of crashes, and we contributed fixes to GObject-Introspection metadata upstream. And we proposed big patches for the gtk-sharp GAPI generator. And of course we updated our Banshee managed playback backend to the new GStreamerSharp API.

    Main kudos should go to him though. I mainly added Banshee expertise, gtk-sharp contributing expertise, and lots of motivation (or at least I thought).

    We had a big success: a Banshee playing audio with GStreamerSharp. Unfortunately video playback was freezing. But some months later after the hackfest we fixed it, and we released first GStreamerSharp 1.0 preview, which we called "0.99.0", and we released the first Banshee release that depends on this work: 2.9.1.

    And it was my first time in Austria (and in Vienna). Overall a great experience, and I need to mention our awesome sponsors:


    The GNOME Foundation, providers of the GNOME desktop


    The University of Vienna and the Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, our venue sponsors

    Collabora Ltd, Open Source Consulting

    Norkart AS, Norway’s premier supplier of Geographic Information Systems and related consulting


    Novacoast IT, Professional Services and Product Development

     
    Hotel Schottenpoint, our hotel partner

    Labels: , , , ,


    This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

    Categories

    RSS of the category Gnome
    RSS of the category Mono
    RSS of the category C#
    RSS of the category Programming
    RSS of the category Mozilla
    RSS of the category Web Development
    RSS of the category Security
    RSS of the category Open Source
    RSS of the category Engineering
    RSS of the category Misc
    RSS of the category Politics

    Contact with me:
    aaragonesNOSPAMes@gnNOSPAMome.org

    Archive
    My Photo
    Name:
    Location: Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Follow me on Twitter